"The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated,
but to make complicated things simple."
- Stanley Gudder (Professor of Mathematics, University of Denver)

Each link above takes you to a section of this website that contains material developed specifically for the purposes identified.

If you would like to go directly to the download section, click on the "All Downloads" link.

Noel Evans, Ph.D. Page

Mathguy.us is happy to provide some of the works of Noel Evans, Ph.D. on this page. Dr. Evans graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1968 with a Ph.D. in Mathematics. Over the years, he has concentrated his work mostly on Math Education. Dr. Evans has written a number of books and many computer programs with an emphasis on Math Education. Mostly these explore possibilities in arithmetic and in Number Theory.

Dr. Evans taught at Angelo State University for 30 years, at Tulsa Junior College for 7 years and as a graduate student at University of Texas for several years. He also taught for 4 years (7th thru 12th grades) at Ambleside private school in San Angelo. Many of his papers were written while teaching at Ambleside.

Dr. Evans approach to teaching Mathematics has been guided by the quote at the top of this page "The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated, but to make complicated things simple." - Stanley Gudder (Professor of Mathematics, University of Denver). He is interested in making math more accessible, enjoyable and real-world related for students and others. We hope that you enjoy Dr. Evans' work as much as we do at mathguy.us.

Short Papers

In some of the papers below, negative numbers are expressed in bar notation. For example, -9 might be expressed as 9 with a bar over the 9. In these cases, the bar simply represents an alternative method for expressing a negative number and not that the digit or digits are repeating.

Mastering the techniques presented in these papers will make the student much more efficient in solving math problems. Even learning one or two of these techniques should imrove the student's work. Use as many techniques as you can to save as much time you can.